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I am toying with the idea of turning my garage fridge into a Keggerator and kegging 5lt of the droids 10l capacity and bottling the remaining 5l.

From what I have read, forced carbonation enables consumption in 48 hours instead of minimum 2 weeks + for natural carbonation in bottles using carbonation drops.

My question is how does the quality of the 48 hour forced carbonation in kegs compare with natural carbonation in bottles for 2 + weeks. It seems to me that the 48 hour forced carbonation kegging system misses out on the flavour benefits obtained from an extended secondary fermentation stage. 

 

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17 minutes ago, Eltham Brewing House said:

I am toying with the idea of turning my garage fridge into a Keggerator and kegging 5lt of the droids 10l capacity and bottling the remaining 5l.

From what I have read, forced carbonation enables consumption in 48 hours instead of minimum 2 weeks + for natural carbonation in bottles using carbonation drops.

My question is how does the quality of the 48 hour forced carbonation in kegs compare with natural carbonation in bottles for 2 + weeks. It seems to me that the 48 hour forced carbonation kegging system misses out on the flavour benefits obtained from an extended secondary fermentation stage. 

 

If you fill a keg from the droid, chill it straight away then force carbonate over 48hrs then the maturing process will be lost in comparison with keg/bottle sugar carbonation over the two weeks. The Co2 force carbonation keg will be fairly green as they say.

However generally your ss keg after being filled should sit for some time (to mature) just as you would with your bottles before chilling , carbonating etc.

 

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Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, Captain 3 Droids said:

If you fill a keg from the droid, chill it straight away then force carbonate over 48hrs then the maturing process will be lost in comparison with keg/bottle sugar carbonation over the two weeks. The Co2 force carbonation keg will be fairly green as they say.

However generally your ss keg after being filled should sit for some time (to mature) just as you would with your bottles before chilling , carbonating etc.

 

So there is no real time savings by going the Keggerator / forced carbonation route If you want a premium result. Just less hassle with bottling method and the convenience of pouring a beer from a tap.

 

 

Edited by Eltham Brewing House
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6 hours ago, Eltham Brewing House said:

So there is no real time savings by going the Keggerator / forced carbonation route If you want a premium result. Just less hassle with bottling method and the convenience of pouring a beer from a tap.

 

 

I think there are a few gains:-

 1) you can get the amount of carbonation required consistently correct

2) correct and consistent dispensing pressure

3) easy correction and very limited loss of beer if over-carbonated

4) you can be dispensing very early (not waiting 2 weeks +) if you wish

5) IMO the end result is a crisper, fresher beer than sugar types of primer

However the cost in setting up properly is not cheap if you already have the Beerflo set up. ( which IMO is a very good system if you get it right)

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I still think good beer takes time and once you’re ahead of the consumption curve the matured kegs just keep coming good week after week and you get to enjoy the beer at its  best. Unless you’re brewing all grain I don’t think you can skimp on the maturing time.

I’ve said a few times on here that I’d like a 3 tap kegerator just so that I could share a few different beers in a session without the fuss of pre-chilling kegs and swapping in and out of the Brewflo. 

I’ve never equated home brewing with saving money but many do so here’s something to consider:

Like all kegging systems the Brewflo is imperfect and requires some learning and trial and error, but once you get it right it’s a great system. So if you were to purchase three (they’re going very cheaply second hand) you’d still be way ahead financially than if you bought a Kegland Series X, three tap font, 4 x 10L kegs, gas etc. 

I haven’t measured them (perhaps I should) but depending on your setup at home it’s possible that 3 Brewflos take up less space and use less electricity than a kegerator too.

If you decided at certain times of the year you didn’t need 3 beers on the go you could put one or more away and out of sight and save on the running costs too.

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  • 2 months later...
On 18/04/2021 at 2:15 PM, Dustin Frothman said:

I still think good beer takes time and once you’re ahead of the consumption curve the matured kegs just keep coming good week after week and you get to enjoy the beer at its  best. Unless you’re brewing all grain I don’t think you can skimp on the maturing time.

I’ve said a few times on here that I’d like a 3 tap kegerator just so that I could share a few different beers in a session without the fuss of pre-chilling kegs and swapping in and out of the Brewflo. 

I’ve never equated home brewing with saving money but many do so here’s something to consider:

Like all kegging systems the Brewflo is imperfect and requires some learning and trial and error, but once you get it right it’s a great system. So if you were to purchase three (they’re going very cheaply second hand) you’d still be way ahead financially than if you bought a Kegland Series X, three tap font, 4 x 10L kegs, gas etc. 

I haven’t measured them (perhaps I should) but depending on your setup at home it’s possible that 3 Brewflos take up less space and use less electricity than a kegerator too.

If you decided at certain times of the year you didn’t need 3 beers on the go you could put one or more away and out of sight and save on the running costs too.

I have been curious about running costs for the system and do agree with your assertion that quality and enjoyability trumps economy in home brewing.  
 

I have sat down with an energy calculator and was surprised (good and bad) by what I found.  bottom line: Droids are cheap to run, While Brewflo’s are not so much.  
 

Droids operate at 43W and if you assume $0.29 per kWh, it seems to work out to about $3-5 per droid per brew.  Way less than I though.  
 

Brewflos run at 150W, end rough maths cost about $1 per day ($30 per month per flow) IF we assume they’re running all day long (likely not) so this is a worse case scenario.  
 

https://reductionrevolution.com.au/pages/electricity-cost-calculator

there you have it folks, A little BrewArt Trivia and OCD therapy …

image.png.6b26c7a5a080e54cdf9b90183c0878f7.png

 

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