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Best time to drink a Keg


Rob Courtney
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Besides the obvious answer...anytime.

If you are new to brewing, the tough decision is how long to leave a keg in secondary to be able to have a flavour that will impress your friends, or in these Covid restricted times, allow you to impress yourself even more than you do when you look at yourself in the mirror first thing.

When a beer has been kegged it will need to go through a process called secondary which allows the beer to mature. Yes you can drink it straight after the second week of secondary, it will be carbonated from the primer but it still has time to go and it isn't like you can slip a keg in and out of the Brewflo and do little samples like you could with your brew bottled, so here are some ideas of how long I have found you should leave your brews in secondary before whacking the keg in the flo.

With Lagers and Pilsners, by the 5th week of secondary, it is starting to build a good profile, your friends will be impressed by the brew, so anytime from that point is good but...

Every week you leave it til week 9-10 gives the profile a bit more character. Now some people will prefer the characters at week 6, some at week 10 but it is in that time that is the strong point of the brew.

I have left lager brews until 16 weeks and it made no improvement other than the head of the beer was a bit creamier but if anything didn't quite hit the higher notes of flavour of weeks 6-10.

If anyone who drinks Brewflo kegs has other  opinions on when to drink kegs and especially from outside my comfort zone of Lagers/Pilsners, I'd be interested in your thoughts as would new brewers 

Edited by Rob Courtney
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  • 8 months later...
On 28/04/2020 at 3:08 AM, Rob Courtney said:

Besides the obvious answer...anytime.

If you are new to brewing, the tough decision is how long to leave a keg in secondary to be able to have a flavour that will impress your friends, or in these Covid restricted times, allow you to impress yourself even more than you do when you look at yourself in the mirror first thing.

When a beer has been kegged it will need to go through a process called secondary which allows the beer to mature. Yes you can drink it straight after the second week of secondary, it will be carbonated from the primer but it still has time to go and it isn't like you can slip a keg in and out of the Brewflo and do little samples like you could with your brew bottled, so here are some ideas of how long I have found you should leave your brews in secondary before whacking the keg in the flo.

With Lagers and Pilsners, by the 5th week of secondary, it is starting to build a good profile, your friends will be impressed by the brew, so anytime from that point is good but...

Every week you leave it til week 9-10 gives the profile a bit more character. Now some people will prefer the characters at week 6, some at week 10 but it is in that time that is the strong point of the brew.

I have left lager brews until 16 weeks and it made no improvement other than the head of the beer was a bit creamier but if anything didn't quite hit the higher notes of flavour of weeks 6-10.

If anyone who drinks Brewflo kegs has other  opinions on when to drink kegs and especially from outside my comfort zone of Lagers/Pilsners, I'd be interested in your thoughts as would new brewers 

Hello Rob

Do you prefer maturing chilled or room temperature ?

Or does it matter?

thanks

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23 hours ago, Andy said:

Also, are there any brew types that are drinkable early?  What about pale ales?

There are a few lagers that are drinkable early (imo) - Birra Italiano, Lawn Mower Lager, Czech Pilsner. The English Pub Draught is a good early ale. For pale ales you could try the Lords English Pale Ale and the West Coast Pale Ale.

Cheers

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2 hours ago, Captain 3 Droids said:

There are a few lagers that are drinkable early (imo) - Birra Italiano, Lawn Mower Lager, Czech Pilsner. The English Pub Draught is a good early ale. For pale ales you could try the Lords English Pale Ale and the West Coast Pale Ale.

Cheers

Thanks...still frustrated a bit by temperature to mature at.  I have a cellar that maintains 18 C year round and is most convent to store the 10l ikeggers.  Do you think that’s safe for most brews?

Room in refrigerator is possible but frustrates better half.

 

thanks

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3 hours ago, Andy said:

Thanks...still frustrated a bit by temperature to mature at.  I have a cellar that maintains 18 C year round and is most convent to store the 10l ikeggers.  Do you think that’s safe for most brews?

Room in refrigerator is possible but frustrates better half.

 

thanks

Hi Andy, maturing in the cellar at 18C is perfect, the only time you'd want it in the fridge is cooling it ready to drink

 

Edit, sorry I can see you are using Ikeggers, C#D will have a better idea on storage of those, I tend to either bottle or keg using the Brewart kegs, which both benefit from 18-26C storage

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  • 1 year later...

Hey all, 

I just stick to a general rule. Lagers 6 weeks minimum, anything else 8 weeks minimum. Of course as first time brewers we hook in at about 4 weeks or less, just to sample the product. But after that just be patient, it’s well and truly worth it. 
Cheers!

Anthony

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9 minutes ago, Anthony Dalton said:

Hey all, 

I just stick to a general rule. Lagers 6 weeks minimum, anything else 8 weeks minimum. Of course as first time brewers we hook in at about 4 weeks or less, just to sample the product. But after that just be patient, it’s well and truly worth it. 
Cheers!

Anthony

I disagree a bit, however some lagers can be consumed early like 4 weeks and are enjoyable with no apparent flaws. Eg Birra Italiano. 
Other that high alcohol brews, and stouts, I think 6weeks plus. Now this is my opinion and would say and agree that longer storage is better, but don’t stick to a rule, try some younger and you may be surprised.

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7 minutes ago, Captain 3 Droids said:

I disagree a bit, however some lagers can be consumed early like 4 weeks and are enjoyable with no apparent flaws. Eg Birra Italiano. 
Other that high alcohol brews, and stouts, I think 6weeks plus. Now this is my opinion and would say and agree that longer storage is better, but don’t stick to a rule, try some younger and you may be surprised.

Hey Captain,

Your experience far outweighs mine. Some of my bottled stuff I will sample early, but given I generally keg, I am extremely reticent to go too early, particularly with the ales; look they taste fine at 4-6 weeks, but  I have found letting them go a bitter longer is the difference between a really great drop at 6 weeks and Angel’s cum on your tongue at 8-10 weeks.

In regards to the lagers I am still working it out, and have discovered I am a bit of a convert. I will try my next batch at 4 weeks and check it out.


It’s all trial and error.

Cheers!

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1 minute ago, Anthony Dalton said:

Hey Captain,

Your experience far outweighs mine. Some of my bottled stuff I will sample early, but given I generally keg, I am extremely reticent to go too early, particularly with the ales; look they taste fine at 4-6 weeks, but  I have found letting them go a bitter longer is the difference between a really great drop at 6 weeks and Angel’s cum on your tongue at 8-10 weeks.

In regards to the lagers I am still working it out, and have discovered I am a bit of a convert. I will try my next batch at 4 weeks and check it out.


It’s all trial and error.

Cheers!

Your not wrong with what your saying, the longer the better, all I’m saying is some can be drunk early particularly if your stock supply’s are down.

However you are right and what you are doing will give you great results. 

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5 hours ago, Anthony Dalton said:

.


It’s all trial and error.

 

Ain't that the truth!

The weird thing is, there are times I drink a beer ( like Duetsch lager) and the first couple of times i had it, just great between 3-5 weeks  and not so brilliant afters and the last time I had it, thought it was crap early on and then about 8 weeks in...bam, absolute treat to drink until I finished it at 3 months. It is why I like to bottle my beer cause I can knock of a stubbie ealy at say 3 or 4 weeks and I'm like "giddy up" or I know to let it sit a bit longer and try again

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Hey all,

I have noticed a lot of the photos in the forum utilise different glasses for different drops.

I hadn’t really considered it, I generally drink from a 500ml stein or a 700ml Pilsner glass. 
 

Are there specific glasses for specific drops? Does it affect flavour across different brews? Any feedback appreciated.

Cheers!

Anthony

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9 hours ago, Anthony Dalton said:

Hey all,

I have noticed a lot of the photos in the forum utilise different glasses for different drops.

I hadn’t really considered it, I generally drink from a 500ml stein or a 700ml Pilsner glass. 
 

Are there specific glasses for specific drops? Does it affect flavour across different brews? Any feedback appreciated.

Cheers!

Anthony

I don’t get overly fussed about it but do believe that a difference/improvement can be achieved through glass choice, particularly in the areas of taste, aroma and head retention.

You can only keep a certain number of glasses in the fridge or freezer so as a general rule - I use the dimple mug style glass for ales (particularly English styles) or the general pint glass. Lagers/pilsners the stemmed Stella glass or the “balloon” glass (forgot the name)07FB149C-58F5-4810-9212-A22D51EC96BB.thumb.jpeg.4b4ae03760630ac7e3b2a89254d2e241.jpeg5F39A028-291F-45D2-B6B7-84413915949B.thumb.jpeg.d3a21eb607bbe97626220b75b9b297b9.jpegFBA81DD1-6EE9-41CE-9DC8-B0E982E1C956.thumb.jpeg.c59bb72027c87f9d920bf1995791489e.jpeg 

 

 

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